Background: Early-life environmental exposures during critical windows (CWs) of development can impact life course health. Exposure to neuroactive metals such as manganese (Mn) during prenatal and early postnatal CWs may disrupt typical brain development, leading to persistent behavioral changes. Males and females may be differentially vulnerable to Mn, presenting distinctive CWs to Mn exposure. Methods: We used magnetic resonance imaging to investigate sex-specific associations between early-life Mn uptake and intrinsic functional connectivity in adolescence. A total of 71 participants (15-23 years old; 53% female) from the Public Health Impact of Manganese Exposure study completed a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. We estimated dentine Mn concentrations at prenatal, postnatal, and early childhood periods using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. We performed seed-based correlation analyses to investigate the moderating effect of sex on the associations between Mn and intrinsic functional connectivity adjusting for age and socioeconomic status. Results: We identified significant sex-specific associations between dentine Mn at all time points and intrinsic functional connectivity in brain regions involved in cognitive and motor function: 1) prenatal: dorsal striatum, occipital/frontal lobes, and middle frontal gyrus; 2) postnatal: right putamen and cerebellum; and 3) early childhood: putamen and occipital, frontal, and temporal lobes. Network associations differed depending on exposure timing, suggesting that different brain networks may present distinctive CWs to Mn. Conclusions: These findings suggest that the developing brain is vulnerable to Mn exposure, with effects lasting through late adolescence, and that females and males are not equally vulnerable to these effects. Future studies should investigate cognitive and motor outcomes related to these associations.

Early-Life Critical Windows of Susceptibility to Manganese Exposure and Sex-Specific Changes in Brain Connectivity in Late Adolescence

Ambrosi C.;Mascaro L.;Cagna G.;Gasparotti R.;Invernizzi A.;Reichenberg A.;Austin C.;Arora M.;Smith D. R.;Lucchini R. G.;Wright R. O.;Placidi D.;Horton M. K.
2022-01-01

Abstract

Background: Early-life environmental exposures during critical windows (CWs) of development can impact life course health. Exposure to neuroactive metals such as manganese (Mn) during prenatal and early postnatal CWs may disrupt typical brain development, leading to persistent behavioral changes. Males and females may be differentially vulnerable to Mn, presenting distinctive CWs to Mn exposure. Methods: We used magnetic resonance imaging to investigate sex-specific associations between early-life Mn uptake and intrinsic functional connectivity in adolescence. A total of 71 participants (15-23 years old; 53% female) from the Public Health Impact of Manganese Exposure study completed a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. We estimated dentine Mn concentrations at prenatal, postnatal, and early childhood periods using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. We performed seed-based correlation analyses to investigate the moderating effect of sex on the associations between Mn and intrinsic functional connectivity adjusting for age and socioeconomic status. Results: We identified significant sex-specific associations between dentine Mn at all time points and intrinsic functional connectivity in brain regions involved in cognitive and motor function: 1) prenatal: dorsal striatum, occipital/frontal lobes, and middle frontal gyrus; 2) postnatal: right putamen and cerebellum; and 3) early childhood: putamen and occipital, frontal, and temporal lobes. Network associations differed depending on exposure timing, suggesting that different brain networks may present distinctive CWs to Mn. Conclusions: These findings suggest that the developing brain is vulnerable to Mn exposure, with effects lasting through late adolescence, and that females and males are not equally vulnerable to these effects. Future studies should investigate cognitive and motor outcomes related to these associations.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11379/583466
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