Background: Even though malaria incidence is decreasing worldwide, travel-related cases reported in Europe have remained stable in recent years. In Italy, incidence had increased in the 1990s, reaching a peak in 1999; a slow decline was then reported over the subsequent decade. To our knowledge, few published data are available on imported malaria in Italy since 2010. In this article we aimed to analyse trends in imported malaria in the teaching hospital of Brescia, northern Italy, over the last 18 years. Methods: All malaria cases diagnosed from 1999 to 2016 in Spedali Civili Hospital, Brescia, were retrospectively identified. Demographic, clinical and travel-related data were described. Results: A total of 1200 cases of imported malaria were diagnosed in Brescia during the study period. Among them, 225 were children. A trend of increasing paediatric cases was identified over the study period, while cases in adults were stable. Most cases were diagnosed between August and October. Patients were most likely exposed in sub-Saharan Africa (87.2%). The main reported travel reason was travelling to visit friends and relatives (66.0%). A significantly higher risk of severe malaria was observed in non-immune patients and children visiting friend and relatives (P < 0.001 and P = 0.006, respectively). Conclusions: Our study reveals a relatively stable incidence in imported malaria cases with a peak during the summertime. A large and increasing paediatric burden of disease was identified. Imported malaria requires attention since in Italy a potential reappearance of autochthonous Plasmodium vivax malaria transmission cannot be excluded. Preventive action and physician awareness should be especially directed to children visiting friends and relatives in endemic countries and to non-immune patients since they both represent high-risk groups for severe malaria.

Imported malaria in northern italy: Epidemiology and clinical features observed over 18 years in the teaching hospital of Brescia

Zanotti, Paola
;
Odolini, Silvia;Tomasoni, Lina Rachele;Grecchi, Cecilia;Caligaris, Silvio;Gulletta, Maurizio;Matteelli, Alberto;Cappa, Veronica;Castelli, Francesco
2018-01-01

Abstract

Background: Even though malaria incidence is decreasing worldwide, travel-related cases reported in Europe have remained stable in recent years. In Italy, incidence had increased in the 1990s, reaching a peak in 1999; a slow decline was then reported over the subsequent decade. To our knowledge, few published data are available on imported malaria in Italy since 2010. In this article we aimed to analyse trends in imported malaria in the teaching hospital of Brescia, northern Italy, over the last 18 years. Methods: All malaria cases diagnosed from 1999 to 2016 in Spedali Civili Hospital, Brescia, were retrospectively identified. Demographic, clinical and travel-related data were described. Results: A total of 1200 cases of imported malaria were diagnosed in Brescia during the study period. Among them, 225 were children. A trend of increasing paediatric cases was identified over the study period, while cases in adults were stable. Most cases were diagnosed between August and October. Patients were most likely exposed in sub-Saharan Africa (87.2%). The main reported travel reason was travelling to visit friends and relatives (66.0%). A significantly higher risk of severe malaria was observed in non-immune patients and children visiting friend and relatives (P < 0.001 and P = 0.006, respectively). Conclusions: Our study reveals a relatively stable incidence in imported malaria cases with a peak during the summertime. A large and increasing paediatric burden of disease was identified. Imported malaria requires attention since in Italy a potential reappearance of autochthonous Plasmodium vivax malaria transmission cannot be excluded. Preventive action and physician awareness should be especially directed to children visiting friends and relatives in endemic countries and to non-immune patients since they both represent high-risk groups for severe malaria.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11379/512168
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