Assessment of appropriateness of left ventricular mass (LVM) for a given workload may better stratify hypertensive patients. Inappropriate LVM may reflect the interaction of genetic and neurohumoral factors other than blood pressure playing a significant role in myocardial growth. Primary aldosteronism (PA) represents a clinical model useful in assessing the effect of aldosterone increase on LVM. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inappropriateness of LVM in patients with PA. In 125 patients with PA (54 females; adrenal hyperplasia in 73 and adenoma in 52 patients) and in 125 age-, sex-, and blood pressure–matched, essential hypertensive patients, echocardiography was performed. The appropriateness of LVM was calculated by the ratio of observed LVM to the predicted value using a reference equation. In all of the subjects plasma renin activity and aldosterone, as well as clinic and 24-hour blood pressure, were measured. The prevalence of inappropriate LVM was greater in patients with traditionally defined left ventricular hypertrophy (70% and 44%, respectively; P0.02) but also in patients without left ventricular hypertrophy (17% and 9%, respectively; P0.085). In PA patients, a correlation was observed between the ratio of observed:predicted LVM and the ratio of aldosterone:plasma renin activity levels (r0.29; P0.003) or the postinfusion aldosterone concentration (r0.44; P0.004; n42). In conclusion, in patients with PA, the prevalence of inappropriate LVM is increased, even in the absence of traditionally defined left ventricular hypertrophy. The increase in aldosterone levels could contribute to the increase of LV mass exceeding the amount needed to compensate hemodynamic load

Inappropriate left ventricular mass in patients with primary aldosteronism.

MUIESAN, Maria Lorenza;SALVETTI, Massimo;PAINI, Anna;AGABITI ROSEI, Claudia;GALBASSINI, Gloria;BELOTTI, Eugenia;AGGIUSTI, Carlo;RIZZONI, Damiano;CASTELLANO, Maurizio;AGABITI ROSEI, Enrico
2008-01-01

Abstract

Assessment of appropriateness of left ventricular mass (LVM) for a given workload may better stratify hypertensive patients. Inappropriate LVM may reflect the interaction of genetic and neurohumoral factors other than blood pressure playing a significant role in myocardial growth. Primary aldosteronism (PA) represents a clinical model useful in assessing the effect of aldosterone increase on LVM. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inappropriateness of LVM in patients with PA. In 125 patients with PA (54 females; adrenal hyperplasia in 73 and adenoma in 52 patients) and in 125 age-, sex-, and blood pressure–matched, essential hypertensive patients, echocardiography was performed. The appropriateness of LVM was calculated by the ratio of observed LVM to the predicted value using a reference equation. In all of the subjects plasma renin activity and aldosterone, as well as clinic and 24-hour blood pressure, were measured. The prevalence of inappropriate LVM was greater in patients with traditionally defined left ventricular hypertrophy (70% and 44%, respectively; P0.02) but also in patients without left ventricular hypertrophy (17% and 9%, respectively; P0.085). In PA patients, a correlation was observed between the ratio of observed:predicted LVM and the ratio of aldosterone:plasma renin activity levels (r0.29; P0.003) or the postinfusion aldosterone concentration (r0.44; P0.004; n42). In conclusion, in patients with PA, the prevalence of inappropriate LVM is increased, even in the absence of traditionally defined left ventricular hypertrophy. The increase in aldosterone levels could contribute to the increase of LV mass exceeding the amount needed to compensate hemodynamic load
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11379/29262
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