Background: Frailty is the most important short- and long-term predictor of disability in the elderly and, thus, might influence the clinical outcome of acute treatment of stroke. Objective: To evaluate whether frailty predicts short- and long-term all-cause mortality and neurological recovery in elderly patients who underwent reperfusion acute treatment of stroke. Methods: The study included consecutive patients older than 65 years who underwent reperfusion treatment in a single stroke unit from 2015 to 2016. Predictors of stroke outcomes were assessed including demographics, baseline NIHSS, time to needle, treatment and medical complications. Premorbid frailty was assessed with a comprehensive geriatric assessment including functional, nutritional, cognitive, social and comorbidities status. At three and twelve months, all-cause death and clinical recovery (using modified Rankin scale, mRS) were evaluated. Results: One-hundred and two patients who underwent acute reperfusion treatment for stroke entered the study (mean age 77.5, 65–94 years). Frailty was diagnosed in 32 out of 102 patients and associated with older age (p = 0.001) but no differences in baseline NIHSS score, vascular risk profile or treatment management strategy. Frailty status was associated with worse improvement at 24 h and higher in-hospital mortality. At follow-up, frail patients showed poorer survival at 3 (25% vs 3%, p = 0.008) and 12 (38% vs 7%, p = 0.001) months. Frailty was the best predictor of neurological recovery at one year follow-up (mRS 3.2 ± 1.9 vs 1.9 ± 1.9). Discussion: Frailty is an important predictor of efficacy of acute treatment of stroke beyond classical predictors of stroke outcomes. Larger longitudinal studies are, thus, warranted to evaluate the risk–benefit of reperfusion treatment in the growing elderly frail population.

Premorbid frailty predicts short- and long-term outcomes of reperfusion treatment in acute stroke

Pilotto A.;Morotti A.;Padovani A.;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Background: Frailty is the most important short- and long-term predictor of disability in the elderly and, thus, might influence the clinical outcome of acute treatment of stroke. Objective: To evaluate whether frailty predicts short- and long-term all-cause mortality and neurological recovery in elderly patients who underwent reperfusion acute treatment of stroke. Methods: The study included consecutive patients older than 65 years who underwent reperfusion treatment in a single stroke unit from 2015 to 2016. Predictors of stroke outcomes were assessed including demographics, baseline NIHSS, time to needle, treatment and medical complications. Premorbid frailty was assessed with a comprehensive geriatric assessment including functional, nutritional, cognitive, social and comorbidities status. At three and twelve months, all-cause death and clinical recovery (using modified Rankin scale, mRS) were evaluated. Results: One-hundred and two patients who underwent acute reperfusion treatment for stroke entered the study (mean age 77.5, 65–94 years). Frailty was diagnosed in 32 out of 102 patients and associated with older age (p = 0.001) but no differences in baseline NIHSS score, vascular risk profile or treatment management strategy. Frailty status was associated with worse improvement at 24 h and higher in-hospital mortality. At follow-up, frail patients showed poorer survival at 3 (25% vs 3%, p = 0.008) and 12 (38% vs 7%, p = 0.001) months. Frailty was the best predictor of neurological recovery at one year follow-up (mRS 3.2 ± 1.9 vs 1.9 ± 1.9). Discussion: Frailty is an important predictor of efficacy of acute treatment of stroke beyond classical predictors of stroke outcomes. Larger longitudinal studies are, thus, warranted to evaluate the risk–benefit of reperfusion treatment in the growing elderly frail population.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11379/555020
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