Day by day, the demand for portable, low cost, and efficient chemical/gas-sensing devices is increasing due to worldwide industrial growth for various purposes such as environmental monitoring and health care. To fulfill this demand, nanostructured metal oxides can be used as active materials for chemical/gas sensors due to their high crystallinity, remarkable physical/chemical properties, ease of synthesis, and low cost. In particular, (1D) one-dimensional metal oxides nanostructures, such as nanowires, exhibit a fast response, selectivity, and stability due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, well-defined crystal orientations, controlled unidirectional electrical properties, and self-heating phenomenon. Moreover, with the availability of large-scale production methods for nanowire growth such as thermal oxidation and evaporation-condensation growth, the development of highly efficient, low cost, portable, and stable chemical sensing devices is possible. In the last two decades, tremendous advances have been achieved in 1D nanostructured gas sensors ever since the pioneering work by Comini on the development of a SnO2 nanobelt for gas sensor applications in 2002, which is one such example from which many researchers began to explore the field of 1D-nanostructure-based chemical/gas sensors. The Sensor Laboratory (University of Brescia) has made major contributions to the field of metal oxide nanowire chemical/gas-sensing devices. Over the years, different metal oxides such as SnO2, ZnO, WO3, NiO, CuO, and their heterostructures have been grown for their nanowire morphology and successfully integrated into chemoresistive gas-sensing devices. Hence in this invited feature article, Sensor Laboratory research on the synthesis of metal oxide nanowires and novel heterostructures and their characterization and gas-sensing performance during exposure to different gas analytes has been presented. Moreover, some new strategies such as branched-like nanowire heterostructures and core-shell nanowire structures adopted to enhance the performance of nanowire-based chemical sensor are presented in detail.

One-Dimensional Nanostructured Oxide Chemoresistive Sensors

Kaur N.;Singh M.;Comini E.
2020-01-01

Abstract

Day by day, the demand for portable, low cost, and efficient chemical/gas-sensing devices is increasing due to worldwide industrial growth for various purposes such as environmental monitoring and health care. To fulfill this demand, nanostructured metal oxides can be used as active materials for chemical/gas sensors due to their high crystallinity, remarkable physical/chemical properties, ease of synthesis, and low cost. In particular, (1D) one-dimensional metal oxides nanostructures, such as nanowires, exhibit a fast response, selectivity, and stability due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, well-defined crystal orientations, controlled unidirectional electrical properties, and self-heating phenomenon. Moreover, with the availability of large-scale production methods for nanowire growth such as thermal oxidation and evaporation-condensation growth, the development of highly efficient, low cost, portable, and stable chemical sensing devices is possible. In the last two decades, tremendous advances have been achieved in 1D nanostructured gas sensors ever since the pioneering work by Comini on the development of a SnO2 nanobelt for gas sensor applications in 2002, which is one such example from which many researchers began to explore the field of 1D-nanostructure-based chemical/gas sensors. The Sensor Laboratory (University of Brescia) has made major contributions to the field of metal oxide nanowire chemical/gas-sensing devices. Over the years, different metal oxides such as SnO2, ZnO, WO3, NiO, CuO, and their heterostructures have been grown for their nanowire morphology and successfully integrated into chemoresistive gas-sensing devices. Hence in this invited feature article, Sensor Laboratory research on the synthesis of metal oxide nanowires and novel heterostructures and their characterization and gas-sensing performance during exposure to different gas analytes has been presented. Moreover, some new strategies such as branched-like nanowire heterostructures and core-shell nanowire structures adopted to enhance the performance of nanowire-based chemical sensor are presented in detail.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
One-Dimensional Nanostructured Oxide Chemoresistive Sensors.pdf

gestori archivio

Tipologia: Full Text
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 3.49 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
3.49 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11379/540312
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 3
  • Scopus 44
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 44
social impact