Background and aims: The effectiveness of adalimumab in the treatment of ulcerative colitis is under debate. Although controlled trials have shown that adalimumab is significantly better than placebo, the absolute clinical benefit is modest. We report data on the effectiveness of adalimumab in a cohort of ulcerative colitis patients treated in 22 Italian centres. Methods: All patients with active disease treated with adalimumab were retrospectively reviewed. Coprimary endpoints were clinical remission at weeks 4, 12, 24 and 54. Secondary endpoints were sustained clinical remission, steroid discontinuation, endoscopic remission and need for colectomy. Results: Eighty-eight patients were included. Most patients had received previous infliximab treatment. Clinical remission rates were 17%, 28.4%, 36.4% and 43.2% at 4, 12, 24 and 54 weeks respectively. Twentytwo patients required colectomy. Clinical remission and low C-reactive protein at week 12 predicted clinical remission at week 54 (OR 4.17, 95% CI 2.36–19.44; OR 2.63, 95% CI 2.32–14.94, respectively). Previous immunosuppressant use was associated with a lower probability of clinical remission at week 54 (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.08–0.66) and with a higher rate of colectomy (HR 9.7, 95% CI 1.46–9.07). Conclusion: In this large “real-life” experience adalimumab appears effective in patients with otherwise medically refractory ulcerative colitis. Patients achieving early remission can expect a better long-term outcome.

Adalimumab in active ulcerative colitis: A "real-life" observational study.

RICCI, Chiara;
2013-01-01

Abstract

Background and aims: The effectiveness of adalimumab in the treatment of ulcerative colitis is under debate. Although controlled trials have shown that adalimumab is significantly better than placebo, the absolute clinical benefit is modest. We report data on the effectiveness of adalimumab in a cohort of ulcerative colitis patients treated in 22 Italian centres. Methods: All patients with active disease treated with adalimumab were retrospectively reviewed. Coprimary endpoints were clinical remission at weeks 4, 12, 24 and 54. Secondary endpoints were sustained clinical remission, steroid discontinuation, endoscopic remission and need for colectomy. Results: Eighty-eight patients were included. Most patients had received previous infliximab treatment. Clinical remission rates were 17%, 28.4%, 36.4% and 43.2% at 4, 12, 24 and 54 weeks respectively. Twentytwo patients required colectomy. Clinical remission and low C-reactive protein at week 12 predicted clinical remission at week 54 (OR 4.17, 95% CI 2.36–19.44; OR 2.63, 95% CI 2.32–14.94, respectively). Previous immunosuppressant use was associated with a lower probability of clinical remission at week 54 (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.08–0.66) and with a higher rate of colectomy (HR 9.7, 95% CI 1.46–9.07). Conclusion: In this large “real-life” experience adalimumab appears effective in patients with otherwise medically refractory ulcerative colitis. Patients achieving early remission can expect a better long-term outcome.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11379/454769
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